Regi Campbell of Radical Mentoring on “Do You Have a Giving Goal?”

Situation: Should I set a giving goal?

After a Journey of Generosity, this is one of the most common questions that comes up. Should I set a giving goal? If so, how do I do it?

Last month, Regi Campbell of Radical Mentoring, shared his thoughts on this issue. Check out more of the great work that Regi and his team are doing at Radical Mentoring.

Below are the Scriptures that drove Regi’s decision to set a goal, and his story of how he set that goal.

 

Scripture: It all belongs to God, and He will measure our use of it.

Scripture that Regi cites as influencing his decision to set a goal:

Yours, O Lord, is the greatness, the power, the glory, the victory, and the majesty. Everything in the heavens and on earth is yours, O Lord, and this is your kingdom. We adore you as the one who is over all things. 12 Wealth and honor come from you alone, for you rule over everything. Power and might are in your hand, and at your discretion people are made great and given strength. — 1 Chronicles 29:11-12

 

Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap. For with the measure you use, it will be measured to you. — Luke 6:38

 

Steps: Move to set a goal

From Regi Campbell:

Over the first 33 years of my life, I probably gave less than $2,000 to the church and charity . . . total!

But when God showed up in my life, I quickly realized that He owned everything. My career, my wife, my kids, my health . . . everything. As I started to read the Bible, I was hit with verses like “everything in the heavens and on earth is yours O Lord!” and “by your standard of measure, it will be measured to you.” I wanted God, my boss, and everyone else to be generous with me, but I hadn’t ever been generous . . . didn’t really even know what it meant. But I knew God wanted my heart . . . my whole heart. And that money was a big thing for me, if not an idol, at least a major distraction. I had a problem. A selfishness problem.

I wanted God, my boss, and everyone else to be generous with me, but I hadn’t ever been generous . . . didn’t really even know what it meant.

I was taught that you don’t solve problems . . . you set goals.

I had set goals for weight loss, exercise, savings, quiet times, reading . . . just about everything, but never giving.

So, I sat down after Christmas and worked on setting a giving goal. I started with what a tithe would look like based on what I expected to earn next year. Next, I figured out what we should save and wrote that number down. Then I built our budget, estimating what we’d need to live on, adding in about 5% for unexpected stuff. So, total expected income, minus tithe, minus saving, minus living expenses equals surplus.

And here’s where I made the big change. I looked at the surplus and decided to set a goal . . . a hard number . . . just for that year. I talked to my wife about it, got her support. We prayed about it and then I wrote it down where I kept my goals.

Here’s where I made the big change. I looked at the surplus and decided to set a goal . . . a hard number . . . just for that year.

In my mind, the first checks I gave throughout the year were counting toward my tithe. But when I reached that number, it started to be fun. I was in “uncharted territory.” I had never given God this much money in my whole life! But it was so cool to write those checks . . . not telling anyone about what I was doing . . . just giving to God’s work and loving it.

I’ve been setting a giving goal every year since . . . 35 of them. In a few of those years, I’ve been blessed to far exceed my goal. One year, I had to borrow the money to make it. But I made it. In fact, while I’ve missed almost all my exercise and weight loss goals, I’ve never missed a giving goal.

Will you join me? Will you set a giving goal?

 

Regi Campbell is an experienced investor and entrepreneur, but first and foremost a husband to his wife of 40+ years, Miriam, and father to two married children (grandfather of 5). He mentors eight young men each year through a program called “Radical Mentoring” that he began in 2000.

 

 

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