Category Archives: Family

Three Lessons on Giving from Aarav and Drishti, India

1. Be Generous—or Your Spouse May Be Generous For You!   “I was really mad about it,” says Aarav. He’s talking about the time, in 2009, that he first learned about tithing. He wasn’t mad that he had to give. “I felt I’d wasted so many years,” he says, “and I decided to do something about it.” Aarav brought his new revelation about tithing to his wife, Drishti. “She already knew and had been hiding money and giving it away!” he says. “It wasn’t going to a proper church, but […]

“I Feel Called to Give, but My Husband Does Not” The Turner Family Responds

Situation: One Spouse Wants to Be Generous  Julie from the UK asks, “What do I do if I feel called to give but my husband does not?” Our colleague Lee Turner and his wife Gerri have walked together on their generosity journey for decades. We asked the Turners to share their perspective as seasoned veterans in trying to give with unity. They’ve shared that, while they have different passions and approaches, they pray together and work to come together to give with unity. Lee notes that “generosity has been a […]

David Wills of NCF-Texas on “How Do I Pass Wealth to My Heirs?”

As we’ve lead Next Steps Retreats throughout the world (check out nextstepsretreat.org to learn more!), one question that comes up often is “How do I pass wealth to my heirs? David Wills has walked with hundreds of families through these questions. He shared at an Atlanta Celebration of Generosity. The thoughts below come from his comments.

“Is it OK for a couple to give separately?” Gary Hoag assesses the situation, takes us to Scripture and offers steps for couples to take

I’ve observed five things about marriage and giving:
1. Most couples don’t live on a budget that they both understand and could articulate.
2. Most couples don’t talk about their giving on a monthly, quarterly, or annual basis.
3. Most couples don’t have a strategy that guides their giving so that our passions align with God’s heart. Couples can think of this strategy as a team effort to shape their hearts, to help them care about what God cares about.
4. Many people don’t know their spiritual giftedness, so they are not deploying themselves in service.
5. Many people are biblically illiterate so they are not stewarding the eternal gospel well.

China: How should I mobilize my family to participate in my dedication to be generous?

A brother from Shenyang, China, went through a Journey of Generosity and asks, “How should I mobilize my family to participate in my dedication?” To respond to this question, a friend from China who loves the Generosity Movement wrote these thoughts.

How generous are you inside your family?

Situation “How generous are you inside your family? I want to give outside as well, but am trying to figure out what level of giving to family I should do.” – Martin, India   Scripture What does the Bible say about this topic? Let’s look at a few passages. Paul tells Timothy, “Anyone who does not provide for their relatives, and especially for their own household, has denied the faith and is worse than an unbeliever.” (1 Timothy 5:8) Jesus notes that every parent gives good gifts to their children. […]

How can I teach my young child about generosity?

Several givers have asked, “How can I teach my children about generosity?” Emyra from Indonesia wrote to ask specifically about very young children. She wrote, “How do I involve my family in giving? Especially my 3.5-year-old son?”

First Things First: Discipling Children.

The question behind the question is “How do we pass the life-giving Gospel of Jesus to our children?” Once they grasp the Gospel, they can’t help but become givers.

I asked my friend Niel in Jakarta about this.

How do I expose my family to charities in the developing world in a healthy way?

Barry’s family visited India to expose them to giving, but it didn’t work.

Barry is a giver in the UK. He took his family to the developing world. He made his wealth in the tech industry and has a vision to disciple his children in generosity. Here’s how Barry (not his real name) describes his situation when he travel with his children, ages 16 down to 8:

We have brought the kids – the main things we do are exposing them to people in need. We want them to realize that we have more than we need, and we need to share. I want them to develop some compassion.

But they have not yet stepped up to thinking that strategically around giving.